Science

A collection by Eason88
43 Resources
Ant Species of the World

Ant Species of the World

More than 12,000 ants species can be found on Earth. Just like their bee and wasp cousins, these members of the Hymenoptera order live in colonies with a queen and other castes. More...

Article
antARK
Mammals: Otter

Mammals: Otter

Otters can close off their ears and nose when swimming underwater and stay submerged for five to eight minutes. Find out more about these adept swimmers. More...

Video
San Diego Zoo
Crustacean

Crustacean

Crustaceans are a 30,000-species subgroup in the phylum Arthropoda. Like other arthropods, crustaceans have external skeletons. They have pairs of antennas, compound eyes, and legs on each body part. More...

Article
HowStuffWorks
Barnacles Are Accidentally Eating Our Plastic Trash

Barnacles Are Accidentally Eating Our Plastic Trash

Not exactly known as picky eaters, gooseneck barnacles attached to debris in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, aka the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, have been munching on floating plastic bits. What might this mean for barnacles and their predators? More...

Article
grist.org
Carnivore

Carnivore

Carnivores eat meat. They have special adaptations that allow them to capture, eat, and digest animal flesh — often, but not always, that of herbivores. More...

Article
National Geographic
What Makes a Bird a Bird?

What Makes a Bird a Bird?

Birds have backbones, making them vertebrates. But what separates them from other animals in that group, such as reptiles and mammals? Find out. More...

Article
Idaho Public TV
Crabs, Lobsters and Shrimp

Crabs, Lobsters and Shrimp

You may not have ever stopped to notice but prawns, hermit crabs, and the other crustaceans in this order of marine animals all have 10 legs. Take a closer look at the order Decapoda. More...

Video
BBC
Barnacles

Barnacles

A walk along the seashore at low tide reveals colonies of barnacles stuck to every surface, even to mussels. Barnacles are crustaceans, related to lobsters, crabs, and shrimp More...

Article
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Reptiles

Reptiles

All reptiles have skin covered with scales and they're are ectotherms ("cold-blooded"). Take a look at the other characteristics of this class of animals. More...

Article
Saint Louis Zoo
Food Chain

Food Chain

Every plant and animal is a link in food chain, passing along energy. It's the circle of life. More...

Article
National Geographic
Adaptation

Adaptation

Adaptations come in 2 forms: structural (how the animal looks) or behavioral (how it acts). Many animals exhibit both kinds.
More...

Article
National Geographic
Albinism

Albinism

Albinism is a genetic mutation that interferes with the ability to make melanin, a chemical responsible for eye, skin, and hair color. People with albinism tend to have very pale features.


More...

Article
TeensHealth
Amphibians

Amphibians

Frogs, toads, salamanders, newts, and caecilians are known for living "a double life" — literally. "Amphibian" comes from the Greek amphibios, which carries that meaning. More...

Article
Saint Louis Zoo
Extreme Animal Cannibalism

Extreme Animal Cannibalism

While eating one of your own kind seems like it should be a bad thing for the survival of a species, that's not necessarily so. Find out why animal cannibalism can make evolutionary sense.
More...

Video
SciShow
Mimicry

Mimicry

Nature is full of disguise and deception. Explore creatures and plants that masquerade as another species by mimicking their look, smell, or behavior. More...

Article
BBC
Herbivore

Herbivore

Animals that feed almost exclusively on plants, herbivores come in all shapes and sizes. They range from tiny insects to the largest land mammals, including elephants, rhinos, and hippos.
More...

Article
National Geographic
Acceleration

Acceleration

You can be speeding along on a bobsled and NOT be accelerating. Yet, if you're slowing down, you ARE accelerating. Get the details. More...

Article
The Physics Classroom
Einstein

Einstein

Explore his lifelong passion for physics, and discover how his scientific insights fundamentally changed the way we look at the universe. More...

Article
AMNH
Physical and Chemical Change: Conservation of Mass

Physical and Chemical Change: Conservation of Mass

Matter can't be created or destroyed: That's one of the most important ideas in science. Meet the genius who came up with it (just before the guillotine got him). And watch experiments that prove it. More...

Video
Zenex Foundation
States of Matter

States of Matter

All matter, it turns out, can change its state into any other state: solid, liquid, gas, or plasma. Investigate the states of matter. More...

Video
Dr. Carlson's Science Theater
What Is a Force?

What Is a Force?

Forces are everywhere, pushing, pulling, causing things to accelerate and change direction. Whenever one object interacts with another, there's a force on each of them. More...

Video
Veritasium
Jupiter

Jupiter

Jupiter, a stormy gas giant, has a diameter 11 times greater than Earth’s. Watch this video to learn how this planetary Goliath may have protected our world and made life on Earth possible. More...

Video
Science Channel
Zoonotic Disease: When Humans and Animals Intersect

Zoonotic Disease: When Humans and Animals Intersect

Malaria, plague, Lyme disease, rabies… The list of diseases that spread from animals to humans — known as zoonotic diseases — is distressingly long. Here are the basics. More...

Article
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
What Is Heredity?

What Is Heredity?

Since we inherit our parents’ genes, how come our sisters and brothers don’t look exactly like us? How come we sometimes look more like our grandparents? More...

Interactive
University of Utah
What Is an Aerosol?

What Is an Aerosol?

Aerosols are solid particles or liquid droplets that are suspended in air or some other gas. Aerosols occur naturally (from a volcanic eruption) or are human made (burning coal for energy). More...

Article
Washington University
Acids, Bases, and pH

Acids, Bases, and pH

If you're facing a test on acids, bases, and the pH scale and feeling a bit confused, you will not want to miss this helpful video. More...

Video
Bozeman Science
Where Do You Get Your Energy?

Where Do You Get Your Energy?

Wouldn’t it be enough just to eat? Why do you have to breathe too? More...

Interactive
Exploratorium
Earth: Overview

Earth: Overview

Investigate the third planet from the sun with this in-depth look at Earth's size, surface, atmosphere and orbit — and the space missions that have shaped our understanding of home. More...

Article
NASA
Neptune: The Outermost Planet

Neptune: The Outermost Planet

Neptune's nearly 4 times the size of Earth but you need a telescope to see this 8th and outermost planet in our solar system. Explore this frigid giant. More...

Interactive
National Geographic
How Tornadoes Work

How Tornadoes Work

Watch the range of destruction caused by the weakest tornadoes up through the most damaging. Then find out how scientists monitor and track these developing storms. More...

Article
HowStuffWorks
Mercury

Mercury

Romans named the planet Mercury after the godly messenger. The planet travels around the Sun faster than any other. Extremely dense, Mercury is believed to be 2/3 metallic. More...

Video
Science Channel
Introduction to the Atom

Introduction to the Atom

Take a look at the structure of atoms, the building blocks of matter. See how people could map out something so small you have to magnify it over 100 million times to see it. More...

Video
Khan Academy
Magnets and Electromagnetism

Magnets and Electromagnetism

Think, really THINK, about magnetism. Some objects move each other without touching. You can make a magnet using electricity. Isn't that odd? More...

Video
Science Kids
How Batteries Work

How Batteries Work

Take a closer look at how batteries work and all the things they can power. More...

Article
HowStuffWorks
Cell Phone Technology

Cell Phone Technology

Did you know that your cell phone is actually a radio -- an extremely sophisticated one? Or that all cell phones use two radio frequencies for every call? Learn more. More...

Article
University of California, Santa Barbara
Potential and Kinetic Energy

Potential and Kinetic Energy

Learn about potential energy from ACME's most devoted customer, Wile E Coyote. More...

Video
Warner Brothers
Tapirs

Tapirs

Somewhere between a pig and a small elephant, the tapir is actually related to horses and rhinos. Little changed over millions of years, these living fossils are an endangered bunch. More...

Article
National Geographic
What Is HIV/AIDS?

What Is HIV/AIDS?

When HIV/AIDS was first identified more than 30 years ago, little was known about the infection and the disease syndrome that it could lead to. More...

Article
Department of Health & Human Services
Community of Rare Gibbons Discovered in Vietnam: Photos

Community of Rare Gibbons Discovered in Vietnam: Photos

Take a look at northern white-cheeked crested gibbons in the wild and learn why these beautiful apes are critically endangered. More...

Images
The Guardian
Animals of the Arctic

Animals of the Arctic

From the baby harp seal and big-footed snowshoe hare to the lush white-coated arctic fox and the distinctive beluga whale, feast your eyes on photos of animals at home in the Arctic. More...

Images
National Geographic
Octopus Photos

Octopus Photos

Go inside this photo gallery to safely view the deadly venomous blue-ringed octopus, as well as reef and mimic octopuses and many other species. More...

Images
Oceanwide Images
In Pictures: Cloned Animals

In Pictures: Cloned Animals

It started with Dolly, but there have been numerous cloned animals since then. Check out their pictures in this gallery. More...

Images
BBC
Momentum

Momentum

This great intro to momentum ends with a mind-blowing idea from Albert Einstein: At one moment an object can both have and not have momentum. More...

Video
Bozeman Science