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archaea

Introduction to the Archaea
Image: iStockphoto.com/gnagel

Introduction to the Archaea

They make up 10% of the life in the ocean. They even live in your gut. Archaea were first found living in extreme environments. Now we know they are everywhere.

What makes these microbes different from bacteria and other forms of life — other than their ability to live life on the edge? Find out.

University of California, Berkeley
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Extremophiles!

Extremophiles!

These archaea are found in extreme environments. From boiling geysers to sub-zero Antarctic lakes to salty waters that would kill other forms of life, archaea make the best of some tough situations. More...

Images
Microbiology Online
Mystery Microbes of the Sea

Mystery Microbes of the Sea

What keeps the oceans from being like a dirty aquarium — murky and toxic to fish? Tons and tons of archaea! More...

Article
Science News for Students
Antarctica’s Extreme Salt-Loving Microbes Swap DNA

Antarctica’s Extreme Salt-Loving Microbes Swap DNA

Archaea from this salty Antarctic lake are prolific gene swappers — which may help them survive where little else can. More...

Article
LiveScience
Archaea

Archaea

They were once thought to live "on the edge of life" where nothing else could survive. Now we know archaea are everywhere. Get the basics. More...

Video
Bozeman Science
Archaea

Archaea

Archaea comes from Greek for "ancient." Here's what you need to know about this group of microbes that can chow down on hydrogen gas, carbon dioxide, or even sulfur. More...

Article
American Society for Microbiology
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Archaea: Why Do Viruses Kill?

Archaea: Why Do Viruses Kill?

Believed to be the first lifeforms, archaea have been hiding a dirty little secret. These ancient organisms are full of viruses — ancient viruses. Take a look. More...

Video
BBC
Examples of Archaea

Examples of Archaea

Archaea have been around for billions of years, but they've only been recognized as a separate domain of life in the past few decades. See and learn about some members of this ancient group. More...

Interactive
NM Museum of Natural History & Science
Microbial Extremes

Microbial Extremes

Many of the world's "extremophiles" are archaea. Understanding life in our most extreme environments may help in the search for life on other planets. More...

Article
Carleton College
Archaea: Fossil Record

Archaea: Fossil Record

Archaea were on the scene 3.8 billion years ago — when conditions were still pretty inhospitable to life on Earth. How do we know that? From the fossil record. Yep, even microbes leave their mark. More...

Article
University of California, Berkeley
Carl Woese Dies at 84; Discovered Life’s ‘Third Domain’

Carl Woese Dies at 84; Discovered Life’s ‘Third Domain’

When he discovered archaea, Carl Woese transformed our understanding of the microbial world — and showed that life on Earth is all related. More...

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New York Times
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Tree of Life

Tree of Life

The three main domains of living things are the bacteria, eucaryota (eukaryotes), and archaea. See how they are different and how they are related. More...

Article
Sheppard Software

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