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composting

Green Guide: Compost
Image: iStockphoto.com/jml5571

Green Guide: Compost

Mix together dry leaves, grass clippings, tea bags, eggshells, banana and avocado peels, and other food and yard waste — and compost happens. Billions of microbes break down all these ingredients, which transform into good-quality fertilizer.

Discover the simple process of composting and how to turn what you may think is trash into treasure for your garden.

National Geographic
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Mushroom Packaging: Innovation Nation

Mushroom Packaging: Innovation Nation

Mushrooms, like other fungi, are one kind of nature’s recyclers. And they are a green alternative to Styrofoam for packaging, especially since they’ll disappear in a month. Hello, cleaner environment. More...

Video
National Science Foundation
Backyard Composting: It’s Only Natural

Backyard Composting: It’s Only Natural

When you compost food scraps and yard waste, you also lessen your contribution to landfills (a source of greenhouse gas). Follow these steps to do some good for your garden and the environment. More...

Article
Environmental Protection Agency
Earthworms: Nature’s Tiller?

Earthworms: Nature’s Tiller?

Earthworms work somewhat like little plows, digesting organic matter to help soil stay fertile. Now you can investigate the number of earthworms it takes to decompose surface material. More...

Activity
Science Buddies
Composter Search

Composter Search

You might like to create your own compost, but if conditions (or people) won’t allow it, you can search for a composting facility nearby. So still save your scraps! More...

Interactive
Biodegradable Products Institute
Decomposers and Scavengers

Decomposers and Scavengers

Discover how organisms large and small work together to break down organic materials and provide nutrients. Composting wouldn’t work without them. More...

Video
New Hampshire Public TV
Decomposing Energy: Extracting Heat Energy from a Compost Pile

Decomposing Energy: Extracting Heat Energy from a Compost Pile

By composting, you can reduce the garbage you generate every day and create a prize for plants. Try this to see if the heat generated by your compost pile can warm some water. More...

Activity
Science Buddies
Disappearing Act: How Fast Do Different Materials Decompose?

Disappearing Act: How Fast Do Different Materials Decompose?

Lots of products made of different materials claim to be biodegradable or compostable. Discover which decompose the fastest — and how they do it. More...

Activity
Science Buddies
Frequently Asked Questions: Composting in Schools

Frequently Asked Questions: Composting in Schools

Experts answer lots of questions about composting, including: How long does it take? How can you tell when compost is finished? Will it smell bad? How do you keep rats away? What about flies? More...

Article
Cornell University
How to Build a Compost Bin

How to Build a Compost Bin

Composting takes place naturally, but you can speed the process with five easy methods. Choose the one that suits your building skills (and patience) best. More...

Article
University of Missouri
Worm Farm

Worm Farm

Kevin loves garbage! But he also wants to put an end to landfills. Meet this young scientist and see how he collects worm “pee” and shares his data about how worms decompose organic waste. More...

Profile
DragonflyTV/PBS
Worms Quiz

Worms Quiz

Worms may not make very good pets, but they are very helpful animals. Answer ten questions about worms, garbage, and composting, and discover what you know about one way to help the environment. More...

Interactive
City of Tacoma
Zero Waste

Zero Waste

Working toward a world with no garbage by the year 2020 is San Francisco's goal. See what the city is doing to prevent, reduce, and reuse waste, as well as recycle and compost. More...

Article
San Francisco Dept. of the Environment

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