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echolocation

Echolocation
Image: ASU School of Life Sciences

Echolocation

Some bats and other animals produce sound waves — a phenomenon known as echolocation, aka biosonar — to navigate or to locate objects, such as food. The waves bounce off the object and back to the animal, with information on size, shape, and location.

Find out more about the animals that use echolocation. Can humans make use of this awesome ability?

ASU
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Night Time (The Bat Echolocation Song)

Night Time (The Bat Echolocation Song)

Do you learn better when ideas are set to music? Then you’re in luck: Biology students rock out in this music video adaptation of Rebecca Black’s “Friday.” More...

Video
We Love Women in Science
Echolocation Lifeline

Echolocation Lifeline

Watch how narwhals — the whales known as “unicorns of the sea” — use echolocation to locate holes in the Arctic ice that are vital to their survival. More...

Video
BBC
Echolocation Tricks Bats into Trying to Drink from Sheets of Metal

Echolocation Tricks Bats into Trying to Drink from Sheets of Metal

How do bats use echolocation to find bodies of water? In seeking an answer to this question, scientists used smooth metal plates. Watch these bats as they try to "drink" the metal plate. More...

Video
Popular Science
Homing in on Mammalian Echolocation

Homing in on Mammalian Echolocation

How and why some animals developed echolocation skills has been a bit of a mystery. Explore how scientists are using new technologies to study this phenomenon. More...

Article
Scientific American
Echolocation  Interactive Audio Video Installation

Echolocation Interactive Audio Video Installation

Intermedia artist Kyle Duffield presents an interactive installation that translates the principles of bat echolocation into visual feedback. This video is the next best thing to being there! More...

Video
Kyle Duffield
Echolocation Experiment

Echolocation Experiment

If you have a computer, a microphone, and can download some audio editing software, then you can run your own cool echolocation experiment. More...

Activity
The Naked Scientists
Echolocation Puzzle

Echolocation Puzzle

Use echolocation to find the pigs hidden in a grid in this game. The more pigs you search for, the more complex the sound paths. Good luck! More...

Game
Earthwood Designs
Echolocation: Daniel Kish

Echolocation: Daniel Kish

Daniel Kish, blind since he was a baby, uses tongue clicks to echolocate — and leads a very active life that includes hiking. He teaches this skill to children. More...

Video
National Geographic
Human Echolocation: Using Tongue-Clicks to Navigate the World

Human Echolocation: Using Tongue-Clicks to Navigate the World

Dolphins and bats aren’t the only creatures that “see” with sonar. As this article and video shows, some blind people are learning to do the same thing, using nothing but their mouths and ears. More...

Video
BBC
Scientist Profile: Bat Biologist

Scientist Profile: Bat Biologist

Erin Gillam uses a virtual bat to track the Mexican Free-Tailed Bat. She hopes to discover how these fuzzy fliers can limit the insect population and help south Texas farmers. More...

Profile
DragonflyTV/PBS
Weird Connections: Quack Science

Weird Connections: Quack Science

How are duck quacks, bat echolocation, and fighter-pilot multitasking related? Watch this awesome video to find out. More...

Video
Discovery

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