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evergreens

What Is an Evergreen?
Image: iStockphoto.com/Tina_Rencelj

What Is an Evergreen?

Not all trees lose their leaves in autumn. Those that keep them year-round are called evergreens because they're always (ever) green.

But conifer trees — what you probably picture when you think of a Christmas tree — aren't the only kind of evergreens. This group of plants includes shrubs, like holly and boxwood, as well as plants that live in tropical rainforests.

Elizabeth Farms
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