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X-Ray Astronomy: Supernovae and Their Remnants
Image: iStockphoto.com/Pitris

X-Ray Astronomy: Supernovae and Their Remnants

At the end of its life, a massive star goes out with a bang, exploding as a supernova. It's often visible to the naked eye and outshines everything in the sky. Powerful telescopes can capture images of explosion remnants thousands of years later.

The end-product of the original star can be a small, super-dense neutron star, a black hole — or nothing at all.

NASA
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Cool Cosmos

Cool Cosmos

Those brainy people at Cal Tech have assembled a boatload of space slider puzzles to test your abilities. Choose your level and take the challenge. Good luck! More...

Game
ipac
Caroline Moore: Teen Astronomer/Singer

Caroline Moore: Teen Astronomer/Singer

Meet the teenage amateur astronomer who got to hang out with Barack and Michelle Obama after discovering an extremely rare supernova. More...

Profile
NOVA/PBS
2012: Fear No Supernova

2012: Fear No Supernova

December 2012 came and went without any catastrophic cosmic events. Find out what it would take for Earth to be affected by a supernova explosion or a gamma-ray burst. More...

Article
NASA
Field Guide to X-Ray Sources: Supernovas, and Supernova Remnants

Field Guide to X-Ray Sources: Supernovas, and Supernova Remnants

Supernovae are not one-size-fits-all. Explore the different types in this field guide, courtesy of Harvard’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. More...

Article
NASA
Supernova Photos: Great Images of Star Explosions

Supernova Photos: Great Images of Star Explosions

As you click through these photos, don’t miss the composite of remnants from RCW 86 — the first documented supernova, viewed by the Chinese more than 1,800 years ago. More...

Images
Space.com
Birth of a Type II Supernova

Birth of a Type II Supernova

Walk a massive star through its spectacular end as a Type II supernova, followed by an encore as a neutron star in this excellent interactive. More...

Interactive
WGBH/PBS
Blasts from the Past: Historic Supernovas

Blasts from the Past: Historic Supernovas

Supernovae occur roughly every 50 years. Early astronomers observed them as they occurred; and their remnants appear in X-rays today. Check out the animations and the timeline. More...

Article
NASA
Photos: New Supernova Explodes in Galaxy M95

Photos: New Supernova Explodes in Galaxy M95

Amateur and professional astronomers around the world had a field day with the 2012 appearance of a supernova in Galaxy M95. See their amazing photos! More...

Images
Space.com
Spectacular Death: A Supernova Quiz

Spectacular Death: A Supernova Quiz

Test your supernova know-how with this challenging quiz. Hint: Check out some of the resources on this page before you attempt it. More...

Interactive
HowStuffWorks
Supernova 1987a

Supernova 1987a

February 23, 1987 was an epic day in astronomy: light arrived from the closest known supernova for the first time since 1604. Watch the vintage TV clips (big hair, padded shoulders!). More...

Video
BBC
Echoes of a Supernova

Echoes of a Supernova

When no one seems to catch a supernova explosion in real time, what can you do? Study the way it echoes through cloud dust, using the Spitzer Space Telescope. More...

Video
NASA/JPL
NASA’s Great Observatories May Unravel 400-Year-Old Supernova Mystery

NASA’s Great Observatories May Unravel 400-Year-Old Supernova Mystery

Modern astronomy provides a trio of ways to view a remnant of the supernova witnessed by — and named for — 17th-century German astronomer Johannes Kepler. More...

Article
NASA

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