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tsunamis

Tsunamis 101
Image: iStockphoto.com/Reniw-Imagery

Tsunamis 101

These waves doesn't crest and break. They move in like a wall of water, crashing over the coastline. Tsunamis can engulf a 10-story building and reach a mile inland.

More damage is caused when the wave recedes, dragging everything in it back underwater. Find out how tsunamis get their start after an earthquake — and just how fast they can travel.

National Geographic
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The Tsunami from Outer Space

The Tsunami from Outer Space

An asteroid the size of San Francisco slammed into the sea 65 million years ago, leaving an impact crater 20 times as deep as the Grand Canyon… And triggering one colossal tsunami. More...

Video
BBC
2011 Japan Earthquake Map and  Video Reports

2011 Japan Earthquake Map and Video Reports

The biggest earthquake on record — magnitude 9.0 — struck Fukushima, Japan on March 11, 2012. Explore its immense damage and destruction, including a huge tsunami that swept away thousands and reached the U.S. West Coast. More...

Article
BBC
Japan Tsunami: Before & After

Japan Tsunami: Before & After

The deadly tsunami that stuck Japan on March 11, 2011 was captured in a series of unforgettable pictures. But the best way to get a sense of the spectacular damage is with these zoomable satellite images. More...

Images
National Geographic
Tsunami Defence

Tsunami Defence

Can we do anything about tsunamis, those monstrous waves often produced by undersea earthquakes? Some British engineers think they might be able to. More...

Video
University College, London
Anatomy of a Tsunami

Anatomy of a Tsunami

See how the monstrous series of waves in the 2004 tsunami developed on the seafloor and collided with coasts around the Indian Ocean. More...

Interactive
NOVA/PBS
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Atlantic Ocean Tsunamis

Atlantic Ocean Tsunamis

Most tsunamis strike in the Pacific Ocean — but not all of them. Investigate the "time travel maps" of three rare Atlantic Ocean tsunamis. More...

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Geology.com
Puerto Rico Trench: Implications for Plate Tectonics

Puerto Rico Trench: Implications for Plate Tectonics

The deepest part of the Atlantic Ocean, the Puerto Rico Trench sits at the boundary of two tectonic plates sliding past each other. Investigate more about its high seismicity and large earthquakes. More...

Article
NOAA
Tsunami Quiz: 10 Facts on Killer Waves

Tsunami Quiz: 10 Facts on Killer Waves

How much do you know about these deadly walls of water? Find out. More...

Interactive
National Geographic
Tsunamis: Photo Gallery

Tsunamis: Photo Gallery

Take a visual tour of the wake of destruction left by recent killer waves including the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2010 Chile tsunamis. More...

Images
National Geographic
Once and Future Tsunamis

Once and Future Tsunamis

Explore 8 of the deadliest tsunamis of the past and see where the next big one could strike. More...

Interactive
NOVA/PBS
Tsunamis

Tsunamis

Put your smarts to the test with this quick quiz about the causes of tsunamis and the damage they can do. More...

Interactive
BBC

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