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Philo T. Farnsworth: The Birth of Television
Image: iStockphoto.com/vladru

Philo T. Farnsworth: The Birth of Television

Now that TVs have gotten so good — they can show details our eyes can't even detect — how could they get better? Visit the sites below to find out.

But first, let's go back to a time when a small, flickering, black-and-white image was the most amazing thing many people had ever seen. This rare film shows not only TV at its start, but the man who imagined it.

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In Living Color: The Science and Mathematics of Color

In Living Color: The Science and Mathematics of Color

No matter what technology TVs (or computer screens) use, they all produce red, green, and blue light. Why these colors and no others? More...

Article
Tom O'Haver
John Logie Baird Biography

John Logie Baird Biography

Meet the Scottish engineer and inventor who was the first person to demonstrate a working TV. Some consider him "the father of television." More...

Article
National Library of Scotland
6 Things You May Not Know About the Afterglow of the Big Bang

6 Things You May Not Know About the Afterglow of the Big Bang

Do you like watching "The Big Bang Theory" on TV? Find an old analog TV, unhook it from cable, tune it between stations, and you can watch the Big Bang itself. More...

Article
Physics.org
Big Dream, Small Screen

Big Dream, Small Screen

At age 14, Philo T. Farnsworth got the idea for television from rows of potatoes on his family farm. But are any inventions the work of one person anymore? How much credit should Farnsworth get? More...

Profile
American Experience/PBS
Enough Pixels Already!

Enough Pixels Already!

TV and computer images are made of millions of tiny dots of light called pixels. But adding more pixels to pictures may be useless, because our eyes can't detect the improvement. More...

Article
NBC
Holographic Television: The New 3D?

Holographic Television: The New 3D?

Today's 3D TVs may cause headaches. Holographic TV makes light travel to your eyes exactly as if were coming from real 3D objects. Experts now say we'll have holographic TV in the next decade. More...

Video
BBC
How OLEDs (Organic LEDs) Work

How OLEDs (Organic LEDs) Work

TV screens made with organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) may get so thin, light, and flexible, you'll wear them. If you're rich, you can buy an OLED TV now. More...

Article
ExplainThatStuff!
LCDs (Liquid Crystal Displays)

LCDs (Liquid Crystal Displays)

Materials called liquid crystals, which are not totally solid, but not totally liquid either, seemed useless when first discovered. Now, you see them when you look at an LCD screen. More...

Article
ExplainThatStuff!
Plasma TV

Plasma TV

How do you make a picture from gas so hot it becomes plasma? What's plasma, anyway? And which is better, plasma or LCD TVs? The answers here are sharp and clear. More...

Article
ExplainThatStuff!
The Secret Life of the Television

The Secret Life of the Television

These drawings do a good job of explaining how the old "CRT" televisions worked. (In other words, the fat ones, which you may still find at your grandparents' house.) More...

Images
Tim Hunkin
TV Buying Guide

TV Buying Guide

Wondering where TV technology stands right now (2014), and what's just ahead? This buying guide will tune you in. More...

Video
CNET
Understanding 3D TV

Understanding 3D TV

3D may sound like the next big thing in TV. But not everyone can watch it, and so far there's not that much to watch. More...

Video
CNET

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